High Holidays

Gossip

By RABBI JOSEPH H. PROUSER

Among the first textbooks I used in studying Hebrew was one titled “B’Yad Ha-Lashon.” The text was replete with vocabulary lists, exercises, and model conversations… and was accompanied by a set of LP records – making of our home turntables diminutive language labs.

The text...
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The original Succot celebration

By TED ROBERTS, the SCRIBBLER ON THE ROOF

Succot, like perfect sweet and sour cabbage soup, has two flavors. A single holiday with two themes.  We celebrate the bounty of the grape and olive harvest in the Promised Land; also we commemorate 40 hungry years of wanderings in that huge...
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Area rabbis dwell on significance of Succot

By NICHOLAS HAMBURGER, Exclusive to the CCJN

At sundown on Sunday, October 13, the agricultural festival Succot begins, continuing throughout the week until nightfall on Sunday, October 20. Referred to as “the feast of ingathering” in the Book of Exodus, the holiday celebrates the end of the harvest season, when...
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Off the Pulpit: Hide and Seek

By RABBI DAVID WOLPE

Many of the high points of the Jewish tradition depend upon the end of concealment. In the Torah, God was long hidden from humanity until Abraham managed to see the world as filled with God’s presence. At Sinai, the notion of ‘revelation’ presupposes that before, there...
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Beautiful!

By RABBI JOSEPH H. PROUSER.

A Succah is kosher – it fulfills the requirements of Jewish Law – even if its walls are unadorned… even if it is devoid of decorations, fruits, gourds, garlands and flowers. Yet the widespread custom is to festoon the succah with just such embellishments.

We...
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God’s Prayer – and ours

By RABBI DAVID WOLPE

At the beginning of the Talmud, in tractate Berachot, there is a curious question — What is God’s prayer? The Rabbis answer that God prays, “May My mercy overcome My anger.”

When our tradition speaks of God, it is also teaching something about humanity. For...
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“We”

By RABBI JOSEPH H. PROUSER

Like much of Jewish prayer, the confession of sins recited on Yom Kippur is conspicuous for its use of first person plural: Ashamnu, Bagadnu, Gazalnu – “We have sinned, We have trespassed, We have robbed….” Al Cheit She-Chatanu – “For the sin which We have...
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OP-ED: What working as a prosecutor has taught me about Yom Kippur

(Editor’s note: The author is an active prosecutor in a major U.S. city. Due to the nature of their work, they must write anonymously. )

(JTA) — The court officer calls out the calendar number and reads the docket into the record. The defendant, accompanied by his attorney, enter the...
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Inspiring Jews we lost in 5779

By JTA Staff

(JTA) — The close of every year brings with it bittersweet reminders of the incredible figures we lost in the year that was.

This year the task of remembering the departed is particularly fraught as 12 people on the list were lost to acts of anti-Jewish violence...
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The Mask

By TED ROBERTS, the SCRIBBLER ON THE ROOF

My friend, Herb, likes to get an early start. On the golf course, he stands 20 feet in front of the tee. When he eats out, he brings a drink from home so he doesn’t have to wait for a turtle-speed server...
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