Saturday, October 31st 2020   |

Yom Kippur

How to host a socially distanced break-fast this Yom Kippur

By SHANNON SARNA

(JTA via The Nosher) – All our holidays are a little bit different this year. Most synagogue services will be conducted online. Many people are feeling disconnected from both the ritual of holidays and their communities. And if you are lucky enough to gather with close family or friends outdoors, these break-fasts or other meals are decidedly smaller and more intimate than during a normal year. At...

A year after the Halle terror attack, Jews who were there are still looking for answers

By JOE BAUR

BERLIN (JTA) — The protective locked door had kept out the shooter.

One year ago, that was the bright spot in the aftermath of the attempted synagogue shooting on Yom Kippur in Halle, a sleepy city of 240,000 located about 100 miles southwest of Berlin. 

It was the most frightening terrorist attack targeting Jews on German soil in recent memory, and many saw it as symbolic of...

Gossip

By RABBI JOSEPH H. PROUSER

Among the first textbooks I used in studying Hebrew was one titled “B’Yad Ha-Lashon.” The text was replete with vocabulary lists, exercises, and model conversations… and was accompanied by a set of LP records – making of our home turntables diminutive language labs.

The text took its name from the Hebrew of Proverbs 18:21 – “Death and life are B’Yad Lashon – in the power...

God’s Prayer – and ours

By RABBI DAVID WOLPE

At the beginning of the Talmud, in tractate Berachot, there is a curious question — What is God’s prayer? The Rabbis answer that God prays, “May My mercy overcome My anger.”

When our tradition speaks of God, it is also teaching something about humanity. For this is a version of our Yom Kippur prayer. No individual is composed entirely of mercy, or of kindness, or of...

“We”

By RABBI JOSEPH H. PROUSER

Like much of Jewish prayer, the confession of sins recited on Yom Kippur is conspicuous for its use of first person plural: Ashamnu, Bagadnu, Gazalnu – “We have sinned, We have trespassed, We have robbed….” Al Cheit She-Chatanu – “For the sin which We have committed….”

The plural formulation protects us each from public humiliation. We list the full range of sins together, rather than...

OP-ED: What working as a prosecutor has taught me about Yom Kippur

(Editor’s note: The author is an active prosecutor in a major U.S. city. Due to the nature of their work, they must write anonymously. )

(JTA) — The court officer calls out the calendar number and reads the docket into the record. The defendant, accompanied by his attorney, enter the well. The judge and the  prosecutor are there already, waiting. The defense attorney states his name for the record, as...

The Mask

By TED ROBERTS, the SCRIBBLER ON THE ROOF

My friend, Herb, likes to get an early start. On the golf course, he stands 20 feet in front of the tee. When he eats out, he brings a drink from home so he doesn’t have to wait for a turtle-speed server to bring one. And as the months slip by before the High Holidays, he uses a similar philosophy.

Why wait...

Rabbis Explore Themes of Yom Kippur

By NICHOLAS HAMBURGER, Special to the CCJN

“I have swept aside like a cloud thy transgressions.” Merciful in its authority, ethereal in its imagery, and intimate in its address, this line, uttered by God to the people of Israel in the Book of Isaiah, resounds with the chief concerns of Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year in the Jewish calendar. Also referred to as the “Day of Atonement”...

Area Yom Kippur observance

(Holiday begins at sundown, Tuesday, September 18)

Btesh Family Chabad House (Orthodox) Kol Nidre 6:45 p.m. Morning service/Shacharit 10:00 a.m. Yizkor 12:30 p.m. Minchah service 5:00 p.m. Neilah 6:15 p.m.

Congregation Anshe Sfard (Orthodox) Kol Nidre 6:45 p.m. Morning service/Shacharit 9:15 a.m. Yizkor 12:00 p.m. Minchah 5:15 p.m. Neilah 6:15 p.m.

Congregation Beth Israel (Orthodox) Kol Nidre 6:30 p.m. Morning service/Shacharit 8:30 a.m. Yizkor 11:00 a.m. Mussaf 12:00 noon Class...

Israeli equestrian rider withdraws from world championships due to conflict with Yom Kippur

(Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)

JERUSALEM (JTA) — An Israeli equestrian rider has withdrawn from next month’s world championships because the competition will take place on Yom Kippur.

The International Equestrian Federation event, which will take place this year in North Carolina, is a prelude to the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, where Israel’s equestrian federation hopes to compete for the first time.

Israeli rider Dan Kramer sent a letter earlier this...