Friday, July 30th 2021   |

Tisha B’Av

OP-ED: I helped organize the Washington rally against anti-Semitism. It wasn’t perfect, but it was necessary.

By ELISHA WEISEL

(JTA) — When Nazi tanks surrounded Warsaw, my father related in a rare moment of frustration, the Jews were in shul arguing over who should get “shishi” (the honor of being called up third to the Torah).

It was a story I thought about often on Sunday, on Tisha B’Av. The day marks the destruction of our Temple in Jerusalem and the beginning of exile, the day our...

On Tisha B’Av, mourning incomparable loss, working on increased unity

By DEBORAH FINEBLUM

– Why is Tisha B’Av the saddest day of the Jewish year?

Eerily, not only were both of the holy temples in Jerusalem destroyed on the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av (the first one, built by King Solomon, was demolished by the Babylonians in 586 BCE, and the second, a gift of King Herod, by the Romans in 70 C.E.), but a...

OU to host two live kinot sessions for Tisha B’Av

This year the Orthodox Union (OU)  will not only focus its Tisha B’Av programming on the traditional themes surrounding the destruction of both temples and other historical tragedies, but will also mourn the recent worldwide tragedies that have affected the Jewish community.

The OU will hold the first of two annual Tisha B’Av programs on Sunday, July 18 at 1:00 a.m.CDT live from the Seymour...

Unfinished

By RABBI JOSEPH H. PROUSER

In mournful remembrance of the destruction of the Temple, it is customary to leave part of a wall in one’s home conspicuously unfinished: unplastered, unpainted, unpaneled, etc. An unfinished area of one square “cubit” is prescribed (OH 560:1… a cubit is generally calculated as between 18 and 22 inches). Some provide such a one-square-cubit area painted black. These memorials are referred to as “Zecher L’Churban”...

The Last Paper

By RABBI DAVID WOLPE

For 30 years I have been writing a “Musings” column of roughly two hundred words each week for The Jewish Week. In time these columns went out electronically as well, titled “Off The Pulpit” and now appear in the Times of Israel. The Jewish Week is going digital, so this will be the final column to appear in an actual “paper.”

This week leads up to...

Smoldering

By RABBI JOSEPH H. PROUSER

On the Ninth of Av, we fast to recall the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem. We customarily refrain from eating meat even on the Tenth of Av… when the ruins of the Temple continued to smolder. For this reason, Rabbi Yochanan considered 10 Av the more suitable day for national mourning (Ta’anit 29A). The meaning of this protracted process of grieving is suggested by...

A holiday marking one societal rupture, Tisha B’Av spurs Jewish creativity amid another

By PENINA BEEDE

(JTA) — For many observant Jews, the mourning over the destruction of the two ancient Temples in Jerusalem on the fast of Tisha B’Av actually begins three weeks earlier with the onset of a period of mourning during which it’s customary to avoid joyful activities like weddings and music.

But with much of the world already in a state of mourning as the coronavirus pandemic continues its...

Most Jews don’t know much about Tisha B’Av. That gives us educators a huge opportunity.

By TOVA BIRNBAUM

PALO ALTO, Calif. (JTA) — As a child, I always looked forward to Tisha B’Av, as weird as that may sound.

It was the one night a year that we were allowed to put the sofa cushions on the floor, and after three weeks with no television, we were finally allowed to watch programs about the meaning of the day. We didn’t mind the boring talking heads...

Tisha B’Av begins at sundown Wednesday

Tisha B’Av, known as the saddest day on the Jewish calendar, commences at sundown Wednesday and ends an hour after sundown on Thursday evening. The holiday also known as “the Ninth of Av” is a major fast day and commemorates the destruction of both the First and Second Temples in Jerusalem approximately 656 years apart. It is the conclusion of the “Three Weeks” that began with the fast of the...

Jews allowed to visit Temple Mount on Tisha B’Av after initial ban

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Jews were permitted to visit the Temple Mount following clashes between Muslim worshippers and Israeli security forces.

Jewish visitors initially had been banned from the site on Sunday, the day of the fast of the 9th of Av, or Tisha B’Av, which marks the day on the Jewish calendar that both Holy Temples, which stood on the site, were destroyed,

Sunday also is the start of the...